Cyprus

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Source: EURES The European Job Mobility Portal. For up-to-date information visit the Living and Working Conditions section about Cyprus on the EURES Portal.

How to find a job

The best way to find work before moving to Cyprus is through the EURES portal.

If you are in Cyprus looking for work, you can visit the district labour offices, which are attached to the Department of Labour of the Ministry of Labour, Welfare and Social Insurance, in order to register, get information and guidance and even placement in a job. You will need to show your passport or identity card on the first visit. You cannot register as being unemployed if you are not a resident of Cyprus. To register as unemployed in search of work you can visit the district labour offices: Nicosia +357 22403000, Limassol +357 25827320, Larnaca +357 24805312, and Paphos +357 26821666, or the local labour offices of Polis Chrysochous +357 26821842, Ypsonas +357 25826900, Lakatamia +357 22443717, Free Famagusta +357 23812052, Aradippou +357 24813295, Latsia +357 22815848 and Eastern Limassol +357 25814914.

Due to the COVID‑19 pandemic, the procedure for registering as newly unemployed and for completing registrations changed on 17 March 2020. Applicants can now submit their application by fax and/or email and do not need to visit a district or local labour office of the Department of Labour in person.

District of Nicosia Fax Email

1. Nicosia DLO 22 873170 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2. Lakatamia LLO 22 443718 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

3. Latsia LLO 22 815868 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

District of Limassol

1. Limassol DLO 25 306526 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2. Limassol Extension LLO 25 306563 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

3. Eastern Limassol LLO 25 814923 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

4. Ypsonas LLO 25 305796 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

District of Larnaca

1. Larnaca DLO 24 304532 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2.Aradippou LLO 24 813302 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

District of Free Famagusta

1. Deryneia LLO 23 730465 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

District of Paphos

1. Paphos DLO 26 821670 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2. Polis Chrysochous LLO 26 821850 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

You must enter the following information on the application form entitled ‘APPLICATION TO REGISTER AS UNEMPLOYED’:

1. full name;

2. ID card or alien registration certificate (ARC) number;

3. contact telephone number;

4. name of last employer;

5. letter of dismissal from your last employer or letter of resignation stamped by your last employer.

N.B. Registration is completed only after the Department of Labour officer has called the applicant on the telephone number provided by them. Applicants are responsible for providing the correct telephone number so that the officer can call them to complete their registration. The Department of Labour notifies Social Insurance Services and there is no need for each applicant to be issued with confirmation of their unemployment status.

Cyprus has many private employment agencies. Some of them focus on finding jobs for workers from abroad. Some allow interested persons to register and submit their CVs on a dedicated webpage.

You can also contact the Cyprus Human Resource Management Association for information about employment agencies, and also the Cyprus Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KEBE). Newspapers, which you can find by visiting the official Web Portal of the Republic of Cyprus, offer another good way of finding work. The Public Employment Service of the Department of Labour has an online system for registering for employment and for job searching, including via the EURES website. The EURES Cyprus website has been upgraded and updated. It can now be found at www.eures.gov.cy.

Lastly, making a personal approach to companies which may be on the lookout for personnel with particular specialisations can also be worthwhile.

Text last edited on: 05/2021

How to apply for a job

A job application, with a CV and a covering letter, can be submitted through the Public Employment Service, or directly to the employer or through an employment official at a district labour office. It is very important to state the number of the vacancy in the letter. Vacancies are identified once the particulars of the unemployed person have been entered during their registration with the Public Employment Service.

You can send in your CV through certain large private employment agencies, in order for your application to be considered when a vacancy for someone with your skills and experience arises. This is common practice. You can find these agencies through the Cyprus Human Resource Management Association or by searching online. Some large organisations and some employment agencies have a website where you can enter your particulars and apply for an existing or future vacancy.

The CV is a very important element in the search for employment. There is no standardised CV, but the EUROPASS CV is quickly becoming widely used in businesses circles in Cyprus. Your CV should be prepared carefully and accurately and checked for spelling and other mistakes and should provide a rounded view of your capabilities, knowledge, experience, specialisation and interests. The CV is usually sent with a covering letter stating the title of the job, where you saw the job advertised and how you can be contacted. You will find advice about how to prepare a good CV on the EUROPASS website.

The process of filling a vacancy usually begins with an advertisement, in a newspaper or through an employment agency for example, stating the particulars of the job and giving a general description of the company. That is followed by the submission of CVs by a specified date, initial evaluation of the CVs and selection of candidates for interview. Successful candidates usually have two or three interviews.

Companies often hold written examinations or other forms of practical tests at assessment centres, for instance. The employer analyses the capacities of the candidates in these ways in order to identify the best qualified individual. As a candidate, you must always be prepared in accordance with the job requirements, have knowledge of the specific employment sector, of the environment in the economic sector and of the situation on the ground in Cyprus, and be able to present your strong points.

Interviews for people who do not speak Greek are usually conducted in English, unless there is another common language.

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Finding accommodation

You can find residential properties to rent or purchase by searching through the local specialist press (Greek and English) and websites. Estate agents are also a good source.

Rents and purchase prices vary for many reasons, such as region, district, distance from an urban centre, building index, etc. Before deciding to buy or rent an apartment or property, it is a good idea to research prices, the area and other factors that are relevant to your circumstances.

As a rough guide, the purchase price of an apartment ranges from EUR 1 400 to EUR 2 000 per square metre (m²) and the rent for an unfurnished, relatively new apartment ranges from EUR 6 to EUR 12 per m². Electricity, water and air-conditioning costs are not included in the rent and must be calculated separately.

If you need to borrow money to buy a home, you should contact the commercial banks to discuss loan terms. Information (and details of commercial banks) can be found on the website of the Central Bank of Cyprus. The usual term of a residential loan is 20 to 25 years. The loan may be for 50-60% or more of the value of the property.

Information about estate agents in Cyprus can be obtained from the Cyprus Real Estate Agents’ Association (Tel. +357 22889759, email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and from the Real Estate Agent Registration Council (Tel. +357 22889759).

Text last edited on: 05/2021

Recognition of diplomas and qualifications

The importance of transparency and mutual recognition of diplomas as a crucial complement to the free movement of workers

The possibility of obtaining recognition of one’s qualifications and competences can play a vital role in the decision to take up work in another EU country. It is therefore necessary to develop a European system that will guarantee the mutual acceptance of professional competences in different Member States. Only such a system will ensure that a lack of recognition of professional qualifications will become an obstacle to workers’ mobility within the EU.

Main principles for the recognition of professional qualifications in the EU

As a basic principle, any EU citizen should be able to freely practice their profession in any Member State. Unfortunately the practical implementation of this principle is often hindered by national requirements for access to certain professions in the host country.

For the purpose of overcoming these differences, the EU has set up a system for the recognition of professional qualifications. Within the terms of this system, a distinction is made between regulated professions (professions for which certain qualifications are legally required) and professions that are not legally regulated in the host Member State.

Steps towards a transparency of qualifications in Europe

The European Union has taken important steps towards the objective of achieving transparency of qualifications in Europe:
- An increased co-operation in vocational education and training, with the intention to combine all instruments for transparency of certificates and diplomas, in one single, user-friendly tool. This includes, for example, the European CV or Europass Trainings.
- The development of concrete actions in the field of recognition and quality in vocational education and training.

Going beyond the differences in education and training systems throughout the EU

Education and training systems in the EU Member States still show substantial differences. The last enlargements of the EU, with different educational traditions, have further increased this diversity. This calls for a need to set up common rules to guarantee recognition of competences.

In order to overcome this diversity of national qualification standards, educational methods and training structures, the European Commission has put forward a series of instruments, aimed at ensuring better transparency and recognition of qualifications both for academic and professional purposes.

  1. The European Qualifications Framework

The European Qualifications Framework is a key priority for the European Commission in the process of recognition of professional competences. The main objective of the framework is to create links between the different national qualification systems and guarantee a smooth transfer and recognition of diplomas.

  1. The National Academic Recognition Information Centres (NARICs)

A network of National Academic Recognition Information Centres was established in 1984 at the initiative of the European Commission. The NARICs provide advice on the academic recognition of periods of study abroad. Located in all EU Member States as well as in the countries of the European Economic Area, NARICs play a vital role the process of recognition of qualifications in the EU.

  1. The European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)

The European Credit Transfer System aims at facilitating the recognition of periods of study abroad. Introduced in 1989, it functions by describing an education programme and attaching credits to its components. It is a key complement to the highly acclaimed student mobility programme Erasmus.

  1. Europass

Europass is an instrument for ensuring the transparency of professional skills. It is composed of five standardised documents

The Europass system makes skills and qualifications clearly and easily understood in the different parts of Europe. In every country of the European Union and the European Economic Area, national Europass centres have been established as the primary contact points for people seeking for information about the Europass system.

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Kinds of employment

The minimum working age in Cyprus is 15.

The contract of indeterminate duration is the commonest form of employment contract in Cyprus. However, in some economic sectors, such as tourism and agriculture, there is a great deal of seasonal employment.

Part-time employment

Equal treatment of part-time workers is safeguarded by a special law. The law defines a part-time employee as an employee whose hours of employment calculated weekly or averaged over an employment period of 1 year are fewer than the normal hours of employment of a comparable employee in full-time employment. In these cases, the principle of proportionality is applied, on the basis of which the part-time employee has proportional entitlement to the same terms and treatment as the full-time employee.

Employment of specific duration

Employment of a specific (fixed-term) duration is regulated by a special law. As regards terms and conditions of employment, an employee working under a fixed-term arrangement must not be treated less favourably than a corresponding employee whose employment is of indeterminate duration, except where this is justified for objective reasons. The law also provides that, where a worker has been employed by the same employer on contracts of specific duration for more than 30 months (irrespective of the number of fixed-term contract renewals), the contract is then considered for all purposes to be of indeterminate duration, except where the employer can show that a fixed-term contract is justified for objective reasons.

Teleworking

Teleworking, in which the employed person works from home, is not yet a common practice in Cyprus.

Temporary employment

The practice of temporary employment is not very common in Cyprus, and for that reason there are no specialist offices/agencies offering such services.

Posting of workers in the framework of the provision of services

The posting of workers in the framework of the provision of services is regulated by a special law. The law provides that the minimum terms and conditions of employment of workers posted from undertakings established in countries of the European Union for the provision of temporary work in the territory of the Republic must be the same as those applicable in the Republic on the basis of legislative, regulatory or administrative provisions or collective agreements.

The Department of Labour Relations is responsible for ensuring that the legislation governing the types of employment stated above is implemented and complied with, except in the case of the legislation covering the posting of workers, for which the competent authority is the Department of Labour.

For more information or to register a complaint, contact the Department of Labour Relations.

Nicosia Central Offices

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 2nd floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803100/101 | Fax: +357 22661977

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nicosia District Office

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 4th floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803145/127 | Fax: +357 22661965

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Limassol District Office

Social Insurance Building, 80 Franklinou Roosevelt Ave.,

P.O. Box 71019, 3840 Limassol

Tel.: +357 25819252-3, 25819440-2 | Fax: +357 25819274

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Larnaca & Famagusta District Office

61-63 Lord Byron St., Lumiel Building, 2nd floor, 6023 Larnaca

Tel.: +357 24817800/801 | Fax: +357 24621458

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Paphos District Office

1 Agiou Spyridonos St., 8021 Paphos

Tel.: +357 26822620/40/41/43 | Fax: +357 26822621

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Opening hours: 8.00 ­ 15.00

Seasonal work

Concerning the status of seasonal workers in Cyprus we can identify the following: 

Most of the EU jobseekers that find seasonal employment in Cyprus in sectors such as tourism , they get employed under private agreements with employers. The agreement is for a specified time (normally from April to November) and in most cases the agreements follow the non-compulsory collective agreements. Nevertheless, since the contract law prevails any other agreement, the jobseeker and the employer are free to negotiate the remuneration as they wish. This relation however MUST comply with the “Organisation of Working Time Principal Law of 2003” which specifies in general: 

Text last edited on: 05/2021

Employment contracts

The Department considers that sharing news and information on terms of employment and on collective agreements is a vital tool for maintaining healthy industrial relations, especially in the midst of this unprecedented financial crisis. In fact, all information relating to terms of employment in Cyprus, with full details of the rights and obligations of both employees and employers, as laid down in labour legislation, can be found on the website of the Department of Labour Relations of the Ministry of Labour, Welfare and Social Insurance (www.mlsi.gov.cy/dlr).

The Ministry of Labour, Welfare and Social Insurance has made it a priority to combat undeclared and illegal employment in order to provide equal conditions of competition and promote lawful employment. To that end, four joint inspection teams have been operational throughout Cyprus since April 2009. The teams are staffed by inspectors from the Social Insurance Services, the Department of Labour and the Department of Labour Relations.

A citizens’ hotline has also been set up (Tel. 77778577), which citizens can use to report unlawful and undeclared employment.

All information guides on labour legislation in Cyprus can be found by following the link below:

http://www.mlsi.gov.cy/mlsi/dlr/dlr.nsf/page18_gr/page18_gr?OpenDocument

A contract of employment is not compulsory, but workers must be informed in writing of the terms of their employment. It is compulsory by law to have an agreement prepared and signed, stating the main particulars of employment. That document must contain information on the following: place of work, registered office of the organisation/company, job and duties, date of commencement and, if agreed, of termination of employment, paid leave, remuneration, allowances and working hours and days. The relevant guide can be found by following the link below:

http://www.mlsi.gov.cy/mlsi/dlr/dlr.nsf/All/9AF4442BB7CFB2AFC22579ED0030FF57/$file/2.pdf?OpenElement

For more information, contact the Department of Labour Relations of the Ministry of Labour, Welfare and Social Insurance.

Nicosia Central Offices

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 2nd floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803100/101 | Fax: +357 22661977

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nicosia District Office

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 4th floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803145/127 | Fax: +357 22661965

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Limassol District Office

Social Insurance Building, 80 Franklinou Roosevelt Ave.,

P.O. Box 71019, 3840 Limassol

Tel.: +357 25819252-3, 25819440-2 | Fax: +357 25819274

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Larnaca & Famagusta District Office

61-63 Lord Byron St., Lumiel Building, 2nd floor, 6023 Larnaca

Tel.: +357 24817800/801 | Fax: +357 24621458

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Paphos District Office

1 Agiou Spyridonos St., 8021 Paphos

Tel.: +357 26822620/40/41/43 | Fax: +357 26822621

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Opening hours: 8.00 ­ 15.00

A contract of indeterminate duration can be terminated by either side in accordance with the legislation governing the specific employment and stipulating the period of notice for terminating employment and the reasons for doing so.

Collective agreements between trade unions and employers usually have a duration of 2 years. The employer must inform the employee of any changes to the terms of employment within 1 month. If the employer intends to amend the terms of employment, they must discuss and agree the changes with the employee before doing so. If the amendment worsens the conditions of employment, the employee can claim enforced resignation and take the matter to the Industrial Disputes Tribunal.

Where the company is to be merged with or taken over by another company, the employer must give the employees advance information about the date of the merger or takeover, the reasons which made the decision necessary, the consequences (legal, economic and social) and the measures that will flow from the merger or takeover. Rights and obligations are transferred to the new employer, and that employer must retain the same terms of employment for at least 1 year.

The relevant information guide can be found by following the link below:

 http://www.mlsi.gov.cy/mlsi/dlr/dlr.nsf/All/E3B3C0AD7349C504C2257B57002DE93E/$file/Sygkentrotikos%20Odigos.pdf?OpenElement

Queries, problems or complaints in connection with this matter can be addressed to the Department of Labour Relations.

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Working time

Working hours vary according to sector and profession. Most offices and businesses work from 8.00 to 17.30, with a break from 13.00 to 14.30. In many cases, workers are given an afternoon off, usually on Wednesdays, and on that day work stops at 13.00. Shop opening hours were liberalised in 2013 and now shops also open on Sundays. Adherence to the custom of the siesta from 14.00 to 17.00 is optional and applies only in the summer. Shop assistants work 38-42 hours a week.

Working time (maximum number of hours worked) is fixed by collective agreement. Generally, weekly working time ranges from 38 to 40 hours in most companies. Overtime is paid for work performed outside the specified working hours.

You should be aware that:

For clarification and more information, contact the Department of Labour Relations.

Nicosia Central Offices

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 2nd floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803100/101 | Fax: +357 22661977

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nicosia District Office

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 4th floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803145/127 | Fax: +357 22661965

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Limassol District Office

Social Insurance Building, 80 Franklinou Roosevelt Ave.,

P.O. Box 71019, 3840 Limassol

Tel.: +357 25819252-3, 25819440-2 | Fax: +357 25819274

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Larnaca & Famagusta District Office

61-63 Lord Byron St., Lumiel Building, 2nd floor, 6023 Larnaca

Tel.: +357 24817800/801 | Fax: +357 24621458

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Paphos District Office

1 Agiou Spyridonos St., 8021 Paphos

Tel.: +357 26822620/40/41/43 | Fax: +357 26822621

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Opening hours: 8.00 ­ 15.00

Text last edited on: 05/2021

Leave (annual leave, parental leave, etc.)

By law, workers on a 5‑day week must be given 20 working days’ leave and workers on a 6‑day week must be given 24 working days’ leave over a period of 1 year’s employment. The contract of employment or the collective agreement may allow you more days’ (paid) leave. Workers request leave and take it when the needs of the company permit.

The number of official holidays, on which offices and organisations are closed, varies from 14 to 17 annually. Information about this can be obtained from the Department of Labour Relations.

Information about sickness and parental leave, leave for reasons of force majeure, etc. can be obtained from the Department of Labour Relations.

Sickness leave is fixed by agreement between employers and employees through collective or individual agreements. A worker who does not receive sick pay from his employer is entitled to sickness benefit from the Social Insurance Fund under certain conditions.

18 weeks’ maternity leave are given. 9 weeks must be given before the period commencing 2 weeks before the expected date of the birth. An adoptive mother is entitled to 16 weeks’ maternity leave from when she takes over the care of the child. In the case of a surrogacy arrangement, 18 weeks’ maternity leave are given, starting (at the mother’s choice) 2 weeks before the expected week of the birth or the week of the birth.

Both the father and the mother are entitled to parental leave. A parent who has worked for a company for more than 6 months is entitled to up to 13 weeks’ parental leave after a birth or adoption in order to attend to the care and raising of the child. The law also provides for leave for reasons of force majeure (e.g. ill dependants) until the child is 8 years old.

Insured spouses are entitled to 2 weeks’ paternity leave and allowance within a period of 16 weeks from the date of birth.

If you are studying for a degree, you should be aware that some companies grant study leave. Whether or not such leave is granted is up to the employer. The leave is usually granted to enable the employee to obtain professional qualifications (e.g. certified accountants) or qualifications which enhance his work skills. If you are thinking of continuing your studies, it is advisable to come to an agreement with your employer before making any plans.

For clarification and more information, contact the Department of Labour Relations.

Nicosia Central Offices

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 2nd floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803100/101 | Fax: +357 22661977

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nicosia District Office

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 4th floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803145/127 | Fax: +357 22661965

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Limassol District Office

Social Insurance Building, 80 Franklinou Roosevelt Ave.,

P.O. Box 71019, 3840 Limassol

Tel.: +357 25819252-3, 25819440-2 | Fax: +357 25819274

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Larnaca & Famagusta District Office

61-63 Lord Byron St., Lumiel Building, 2nd floor, 6023 Larnaca

Tel.: +357 24817800/801 | Fax: +357 24621458

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Paphos District Office

1 Agiou Spyridonos St., 8021 Paphos

Tel.: +357 26822620/40/41/43 | Fax: +357 26822621

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Opening hours: 8.00 ­ 15.00

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Remuneration

Salaries are usually paid monthly or weekly. Compulsory payments by employees, such as social insurance contributions, income tax, GHS contribution, and other deductions, such as welfare fund, healthcare contributions, etc., are withheld from their salary.

The Minimum Wages Decree 2009 (KDP 194/2009) lays down the minimum wage payable by law to:

 sales persons, office workers, nursing assistants, child care assistants, nursery assistants, school assistants, guards, carers.

Under the Decree, the minimum wage on recruitment is set at EUR 870, increasing to EUR 924 after 6 months’ uninterrupted service with the same employer.

Although there are no legal provisions laying down the minimum wage for all other professions, the minimum payment stated above is also offered as remuneration in other professions. It should also be said that the Public Employment Service does not accept vacancies offering a lower wage than the wage stipulated for a profession in the Decree.

The pay slip must state particulars such as the employee’s particulars, the basic salary, the deductions and the net salary. The usual method of payment is by cheque accompanied by the pay slip. Alternatively, the salary may be paid into the employee’s bank account and the employee may be given just the pay slip. If there is a collective agreement, pay is in accordance with those standards and the terms of that agreement.

The company (employer) is responsible for paying the employee’s social insurance and general healthcare contributions and income tax. The employee is given information about the total deductions at the end of the year, and during the year the total deductions are shown on the pay slip.

Useful information can be obtained from the Department of Labour Relations or by calling the Ministry of Labour, Welfare and Social Insurance (+357 22401600).

Nicosia Central Offices

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 2nd floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803100/101 | Fax: +357 22661977

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Nicosia District Office

Corner of 54 Griva Digeni Ave., 4th floor, 1096 Nicosia

Tel.: +357 22803145/127 | Fax: +357 22661965

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Limassol District Office

Social Insurance Building, 80 Franklinou Roosevelt Ave.,

P.O. Box 71019, 3840 Limassol

Tel.: +357 25819252-3, 25819440-2 | Fax: +357 25819274

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Larnaca & Famagusta District Office

61-63 Lord Byron St., Lumiel Building, 2nd floor, 6023 Larnaca

Tel.: +357 24817800/801 | Fax: +357 24621458

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Paphos District Office

1 Agiou Spyridonos St., 8021 Paphos

Tel.: +357 26822620/40/41/43 | Fax: +357 26822621

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Opening hours: 8.00 ­ 15.00

Text last edited on: 05/2021

End of employment

Employment can be terminated by the employer or the employee. The first 26 weeks of work are a trial period. During this period the employer or the employee may terminate the employment without notice.

The employee is entitled to compensation if the employer dismisses him after the trial period has expired. The amount of compensation depends on the employee’s length of service.

An employee who has been with the same employer for more than 104 weeks and is dismissed before reaching the pension period because he is surplus to requirements is entitled to a payment from the redundancy fund. The employment of a seasonal worker totalling more than 15 weeks per year with one employer is treated as continuous.

The following conditions apply with regard to collective redundancies:

The following information is relevant for 2021 with regard to pensions:

Allowances for physical injury sustained at work and disability and death benefits are also paid on the basis of Social Insurance Services legislation.

Information on the above matters can be obtained from the Social Insurance Services:

Social Insurance Services

7 Vyronos Avenue

1465 Nicosia

Social Insurance Services (Central Offices) telephone number: +357 22401600

Fax: +357 22672984

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Health system

A new universal General Healthcare System was set up in Cyprus in June 2019, to cover all people living and working in Cyprus.

The General Healthcare System (GHS) is a modern and comprehensive healthcare system which provides equal access to healthcare services for all citizens, allowing them to choose their healthcare providers from both the private and public sector.

1. What healthcare services are provided?

2. Who are beneficiaries of these services?All citizens who have their habitual residence in areas controlled by the Republic of Cyprus and fall under the following categories:

3.How can services be accessed?

Beneficiaries acquire the right to access healthcare services provided that they have registered in the GHS and on the patient list of a personal doctor of their choice. You can register in the GHS and on a personal doctor’s patient list either online or by visiting a personal doctor. The personal doctor is the beneficiary’s first point of contact with the System and is responsible for providing the necessary healthcare, as well as for referring the beneficiary to more specialised healthcare services, as and when appropriate. Beneficiaries may choose the specialised physician, pharmacy, laboratory, healthcare centre or other provider in the private/public sector from whom/which they wish to obtain services.

EU nationals living in Cyprus can access healthcare services under the GHS by registering in the Beneficiary Registry and on a personal doctor’s list. In order to be registered in the GHS Beneficiary Registry, the interested party must be registered with the Civil Registry and Migration Department and/or with Social Insurance Services.

Please note that all non-Cypriots working in Cyprus who have not updated their record with the Social Insurance Services by adding their Alien Registration Certificate (ARC) number must do so immediately.

4. Who will contribute to GHS? What are the contributions?

Contributions are collected by Social Insurance Services, the Tax Department and the Treasury of the Republic of Cyprus.

5. What are co-payments and when do they apply?

The beneficiary makes small co-payments for healthcare services from specialist doctors, laboratories, pharmacies, nurses, midwives and other health professionals, e.g. EUR 1 per medicinal product, EUR 1 per laboratory test, EUR 6 per visit to a specialist doctor. Please note that access to personal doctors and in-patient healthcare is free of charge.

Useful information can be obtained by visiting the GHS website at www.gesy.org.cy or

by freephone (17000 when calling from Cyprus or +357 22017000 when calling from abroad) or

by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or

on the GHS website: www.gesy.org.cy

The GHS Contact Centre is open from 8.00 to 20.00 on weekdays and from 8.00 to 16.00 on Saturdays. The Contact Centre is closed on Sundays and public holidays.

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Income and taxation

Resident taxpayers in Cyprus are taxed on all income acquired or derived from sources in Cyprus and abroad. A resident taxpayer is a person who lives in Cyprus for a total of more than 183 days in the tax year.

The tax rates for private individuals are:

Taxable income 

Tax rate

EUR 0 ­ 19 500

0

EUR 19 501 ­ 28 000

20%

EUR 28 001 ­ 36 300

25%

EUR 36 301 ­ 60 000

30%

EUR 60 001 or more

35%

The calculation of taxable income takes account of deductible and discounted items such as subscriptions to trade unions and professional associations, donations to approved charities, Social Insurance Fund contributions, Pension Fund contributions, Relief Fund contributions, life insurance premiums, etc.

Spouses are taxed separately based on separate annual income tax returns.

The income of a resident of the Republic from a pension in respect of services provided outside the Republic is subject to a tax rate of 5%. The first EUR 3 420 in each year is tax free. You are advised to contact the Tax Department (+357 22660484) for the necessary details concerning your own case (the email address of the Tax Department is: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

VAT rates vary by law according to the type of product or service. The following rates apply:

The delivery of a house, apartment or business premise, etc. for which planning permission was submitted after 1 May 2004 is subject to VAT at 19%.

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Education system

Pre-school education is provided by Greek state schools and by Greek and foreign private schools. Pre-school education is provided for children from the age of three. Children who reach the age of five before 1 September are required to start attending pre-school in that year. Attendance at a private nursery school costs from EUR 1 500 to EUR 3 500 per child per month; the cost at state schools is lower. There are also state and private childcare centres for children up to 3 years of age.

Primary education is provided free of charge in state schools for children who reach the age of six before 1 September of the year in which they start to attend school (from 2021). Age is the only criterion for the admission of children to primary education. Children should have received some form of pre-school education before enrolling in primary school. The school year is divided into three terms of 3 months, with attendance on 5 days of the week. Primary education is also provided by private English, French and Russian schools.

Lower secondary education is provided free of charge for children between 12 and 15 years of age. The criteria for admission to lower secondary education are age and possession of a primary school leaving certificate. The school year is divided into two terms of 4 months, with attendance on 5 days of the week. Lower secondary education is also provided by private English and French schools.

Upper secondary education is provided free of charge. The school year is again divided into two terms of 4 months, with attendance on 5 days of the week. Upper secondary education is provided to students between 15 and 18 years of age. Pupils who wish to be trained in a technical occupation can attend a technical school whose diplomas are equivalent to upper secondary education. There are also private English and French upper secondary schools.

There are also 170 private nurseries, 30 private primary schools and 39 private secondary schools (Greek, English, French and Russian) which operate with the approval of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports and Youth. The cost of attendance is between EUR 4 500 and EUR 6 500 per year.

Children who do not speak Greek are given special lessons in Greek to make it easier for them to join state schools, at which attendance is compulsory and free.

Cyprus has three state university institutions: the University of Cyprus, the Cyprus University of Technology and the Open University of Cyprus. It also has five private universities: the University of Nicosia, the European University Cyprus, the Frederick University, the Neapolis University Paphos and the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) Cyprus. It also has a large number of private tertiary education colleges and three state higher education schools. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports and Youth has approved 44 private schools and evaluates and certifies the study diplomas issued by those schools every 2 years.

Specific information can be obtained by calling the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports and Youth (Tel. +357 22800600) and asking to be connected to the Ministry department you need.

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Cultural and social life

It is hot in Cyprus from May to September. From October to March Cyprus has a mild winter climate with lower temperatures and some rain. The highest mountains have snowfall from December to February. As the island is small, people can enjoy regular excursions to the mountains and beaches. There are many beautiful beaches and mountainous areas to visit. The website of the Deputy Ministry of Tourism is a good source of information.

The island is full of cultural monuments, including Neolithic settlements, classical Greek and Roman monuments, Byzantine and Latin churches and monasteries, Frankish and Venetian fortresses, castles, mosques, etc.

The website of the Deputy Ministry of Tourism provides details on the large number of sports available in Cyprus which interested visitors can watch or take part in. They include golf, car races, airborne sports, tennis, swimming, bowling, cycling, football, horse-riding and sea sports. In winter, many Cypriots and foreigners visit the ski resorts in the snow-covered Troodos Mountains.

Cyprus has a large number of tavernas offering traditional dishes and snacks and restaurants offering various cuisines. There are many entertainment centres in coastal summer resorts such as Agia Napa and in all the towns and districts. A lot of tavernas and entertainment centres offer Greek music and dancing. There are also many clubs in Cyprus which provide entertainment with modern music until the early hours and have the latest DJs.

Text last edited on: 05/2021