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Norway

Source: EURES The European Job Mobility Portal. For up-to-date information visit the Living and Working Conditions section about Norway on the EURES Portal.

 How to find a job

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you additional useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

This website also has its own section for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to start. Work in Norway will be referenced throughout our Live and Work presentation.

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change.

How to search for a job

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving. It also provides information for employers who wish to establish themselves and/or to offer their services in Norway.

From this website you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Finding accommodation

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Recognition of diplomas and qualifications

The importance of transparency and mutual recognition of diplomas as a crucial complement to the free movement of workers

The possibility of obtaining recognition of one’s qualifications and competences can play a vital role in the decision to take up work in another EU country. It is therefore necessary to develop a European system that will guarantee the mutual acceptance of professional competences in different Member States. Only such a system will ensure that a lack of recognition of professional qualifications will become an obstacle to workers’ mobility within the EU.

Main principles for the recognition of professional qualifications in the EU

As a basic principle, any EU citizen should be able to freely practice their profession in any Member State. Unfortunately the practical implementation of this principle is often hindered by national requirements for access to certain professions in the host country.

For the purpose of overcoming these differences, the EU has set up a system for the recognition of professional qualifications. Within the terms of this system, a distinction is made between regulated professions (professions for which certain qualifications are legally required) and professions that are not legally regulated in the host Member State.

Steps towards a transparency of qualifications in Europe

The European Union has taken important steps towards the objective of achieving transparency of qualifications in Europe:

  • An increased co-operation in vocational education and training, with the intention to combine all instruments for transparency of certificates and diplomas, in one single, user-friendly tool. This includes, for example, the European CV or Europass Trainings.
  • The development of concrete actions in the field of recognition and quality in vocational education and training.

Going beyond the differences in education and training systems throughout the EU

Education and training systems in the EU Member States still show substantial differences. The last enlargements of the EU, with different educational traditions, have further increased this diversity. This calls for a need to set up common rules to guarantee recognition of competences.

In order to overcome this diversity of national qualification standards, educational methods and training structures, the European Commission has put forward a series of instruments, aimed at ensuring better transparency and recognition of qualifications both for academic and professional purposes.

  1. The European Qualifications Framework

The European Qualifications Framework is a key priority for the European Commission in the process of recognition of professional competences. The main objective of the framework is to create links between the different national qualification systems and guarantee a smooth transfer and recognition of diplomas.

  1. The National Academic Recognition Information Centres (NARICs)

A network of National Academic Recognition Information Centres was established in 1984 at the initiative of the European Commission. The NARICs provide advice on the academic recognition of periods of study abroad. Located in all EU Member States as well as in the countries of the European Economic Area, NARICs play a vital role the process of recognition of qualifications in the EU.

  1. The European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)

The European Credit Transfer System aims at facilitating the recognition of periods of study abroad. Introduced in 1989, it functions by describing an education programme and attaching credits to its components. It is a key complement to the highly acclaimed student mobility programme Erasmus.

  1. Europass

Europass is an instrument for ensuring the transparency of professional skills. It is composed of five standardised documents

  • a CV (Curriculum Vitae),
  • a language passport,
  • certificate supplements,
  • diploma supplements, and
  • a Europass-Mobility document.

The Europass system makes skills and qualifications clearly and easily understood in the different parts of Europe. In every country of the European Union and the European Economic Area, national Europass centres have been established as the primary contact points for people seeking for information about the Europass system.

 

Types of employment

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change.

In Norway there is no separate legislation provision in relation to seasonal work. 

We do not have data on seasonal, but there is an assumption that “seasonal workers” goes into sectors such as the agricultural, forestry and horeca sector.

For more information please consult this page: https://www.udi.no/en/want-to-apply/work-immigration/seasonal-workers/?resetguide=1

 

Employment contracts

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Working hours

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this website you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Leave (annual leave, etc.)

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

This website also has its own section for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Salaries

If you work for a Norwegian employer in Norway, you have the right to receive the same salary and work under the same conditions as Norwegians.If you work for a Norwegian employer in Norway, you have the right to receive the same salary and work under the same conditions as Norwegians.
In Norway, there is no minimum wage regulation, but in some sectors a minimum wage has been introduced with the general application of collective labor agreements. It is a tool to prevent foreign workers from receiving worse wages and working conditions.
Applicable collective agreements are agreements about pay and working conditions that apply to everyone working in the particular sector, regardless of whether they are a party to the agreement. Some of the sectors that have generally applicable collective labor agreements are hotels, restaurants, construction, agriculture, bus passenger transport, freight transport, etc.
Minimum hourly wage:
Construction - for skilled workers - NOK 209.70, for unskilled workers with at least one year of experience - NOK 196.50;Agriculture and horticulture (seasonal workers) - for those employed for a period of 12 weeks - NOK 123.15, for those employed for a period of 3 to 6 months - NOK 128.65Cleaning - NOK 187.66Fish processing plants - 195.20 for skilled workers, 183.70 for production workers and cleaningHospitality, restaurant and catering - for employees over the age of 20 with more than 4 months of work experience - NOK 167.90. NOK 555.73 for a single room and NOK 361.45 for a double room are deducted from the monthly remuneration for accommodation provided by the employer.Freight land transport - for all employees carrying out road transport of goods (with vehicles with a total weight of more than 3.5 tons) - NOK 175.95.Passenger transport by bus - for the employees of companies carrying out passenger transport by bus - NOK 158.37.

There are distinctions in pay according to sector, age, length of service, etc. criteria. Detailed information by sector can be found at https://www.arbeidstilsynet.no/en/working-conditions/pay-and-minimum-rates-of-pay/minimum-wage/There are distinctions in pay according to sector, age, length of service, etc. criteria. Detailed information by sector can be found at https://www.arbeidstilsynet.no/en/working-conditions/pay-and-minimum-rates-of-pay/minimum-wage/
For work on construction sites, in the marine construction industry and for cleaning requiring an overnight stay away from home, the employer covers the necessary expenses.
You have the right to a safe workplace in accordance with Norwegian law. When you start work, you should receive a written employment contract from your employer. You have the right to pay, leave and holidays. All employees must enter into a written employment contract with their employer. This applies to all types of employment – ​​both permanent and temporary employment.
There are limits on how much you can work per day and per week (9 hours per day, 40 hours per week). These restrictions are defined in the Working Environment Act, but can also be regulated by the employment contract. If you work shifts, nights or Sundays, normal working hours are 38 or 36 hours per week. The duration of daily and weekly working hours must be specified in your employment contract.
If you work in the cleaning or construction industry you must have an HSE card issued by the Norwegian Labor Inspectorate. It is your employer's responsibility to submit the documents for such a card. Self-insured persons submit their documents independently.

Ending employment

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

This website also has its own section for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway) 

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Health service

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

New in Norway will also provide you with useful information relating to the health service. 

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Income and taxation

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to start. 

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Education system

Public and quality-assured information on education programmes in Norway can be found at utdanning.no. General information on Norwegian education can be found on the Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education (NOKUT) website.

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

 

Culture and society

Norway is a young nation with a long history. Norway has always been a melting pot with strong outside influences, even though we like to see ourselves as being authentic and very unique. Norway has a relatively large number of historic attractions and offers a good and wide range of outdoor activities. The Norwegians like to go hiking, not necessarily in order go somewhere, but purely for the pleasure of the walk. In addition to that, the Norwegians enjoy being at home, and even the concept of making themselves comfortable at home has spread to several countries where a larger proportion of leisure and social life normally takes place outside the home.

In modern times, as the country has gradually seen immigration from outside, the things available, particularly in the cities, have changed and become more globalised, and Oslo in particular has a very rich culture. Despite its relatively small size when compared with other European cities (around 700 000 inhabitants in 2020), Oslo is a big player, particularly on the concert scene.

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 2022

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