Norway

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Source: EURES The European Job Mobility Portal. For up-to-date information visit the Living and Working Conditions section about Norway on the EURES Portal.

How to find a job

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you additional useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

This website also has its own section for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to start. Work in Norway will be referenced throughout our Live and Work presentation.

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change.

Text last edited on: 11/2020

How to search for a job

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving. It also provides information for employers who wish to establish themselves and/or to offer their services in Norway.

From this website you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Finding accommodation

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Recognition of diplomas and qualifications

The importance of transparency and mutual recognition of diplomas as a crucial complement to the free movement of workers

The possibility of obtaining recognition of one’s qualifications and competences can play a vital role in the decision to take up work in another EU country. It is therefore necessary to develop a European system that will guarantee the mutual acceptance of professional competences in different Member States. Only such a system will ensure that a lack of recognition of professional qualifications will become an obstacle to workers’ mobility within the EU.

Main principles for the recognition of professional qualifications in the EU

As a basic principle, any EU citizen should be able to freely practice their profession in any Member State. Unfortunately the practical implementation of this principle is often hindered by national requirements for access to certain professions in the host country.

For the purpose of overcoming these differences, the EU has set up a system for the recognition of professional qualifications. Within the terms of this system, a distinction is made between regulated professions (professions for which certain qualifications are legally required) and professions that are not legally regulated in the host Member State.

Steps towards a transparency of qualifications in Europe

The European Union has taken important steps towards the objective of achieving transparency of qualifications in Europe:

Going beyond the differences in education and training systems throughout the EU

Education and training systems in the EU Member States still show substantial differences. The last enlargements of the EU, with different educational traditions, have further increased this diversity. This calls for a need to set up common rules to guarantee recognition of competences.

In order to overcome this diversity of national qualification standards, educational methods and training structures, the European Commission has put forward a series of instruments, aimed at ensuring better transparency and recognition of qualifications both for academic and professional purposes.

  1. The European Qualifications Framework

The European Qualifications Framework is a key priority for the European Commission in the process of recognition of professional competences. The main objective of the framework is to create links between the different national qualification systems and guarantee a smooth transfer and recognition of diplomas.

  1. The National Academic Recognition Information Centres (NARICs)

A network of National Academic Recognition Information Centres was established in 1984 at the initiative of the European Commission. The NARICs provide advice on the academic recognition of periods of study abroad. Located in all EU Member States as well as in the countries of the European Economic Area, NARICs play a vital role the process of recognition of qualifications in the EU.

  1. The European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)

The European Credit Transfer System aims at facilitating the recognition of periods of study abroad. Introduced in 1989, it functions by describing an education programme and attaching credits to its components. It is a key complement to the highly acclaimed student mobility programme Erasmus.

  1. Europass

Europass is an instrument for ensuring the transparency of professional skills. It is composed of five standardised documents

The Europass system makes skills and qualifications clearly and easily understood in the different parts of Europe. In every country of the European Union and the European Economic Area, national Europass centres have been established as the primary contact points for people seeking for information about the Europass system.

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Types of employment

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change.

In Norway there is no separate legislation provision in relation to seasonal work. 

We do not have data on seasonal, but there is an assumption that “seasonal workers” goes into sectors such as the agricultural, forestry and horeca sector.

For more information please consult this page: https://www.udi.no/en/want-to-apply/work-immigration/seasonal-workers/?resetguide=1

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Employment contracts

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Working hours

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this website you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Leave (annual leave, etc.)

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

This website also has its own section for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Salaries

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct.

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway).

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Ending employment

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

This website also has its own section for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to go, as the information here will always be the most up to date and correct. 

Information on employment contracts, work hours, pay and holiday can be found on the Labour Inspection Authority website (link at the bottom of Work in Norway) 

In addition, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Health service

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to public portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

New in Norway will also provide you with useful information relating to the health service. 

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Income and taxation

In Norway, an official guide (online wizard) has been developed for jobseekers and employers called Work in Norway. Work in Norway is an online wizard for those who wish to work in Norway and need advice and information on job hunting, working life and moving.

From this guide you are directed to portals that will give you useful information. You will also find information that will help you during the early stages of your employment in Norway.

The website also provides information for Norwegian employers who wish to recruit foreign labour to Norway, as well as foreign companies seeking to offer their services in Norway.

Work in Norway is a collaboration between the Labour and Welfare Administration (NAV), the Tax Department, the Directorate of Immigration (UDI), the Labour Inspection Authority and the Police. Whether you wish to do business in Norway or seek employment, Work in Norway is the place to start. 

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Education system

Public and quality-assured information on education programmes in Norway can be found at utdanning.no. General information on Norwegian education can be found on the Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education (NOKUT) website.

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020

Culture and society

Norway is a young nation with a long history. Norway has always been a melting pot with strong outside influences, even though we like to see ourselves as being authentic and very unique. Norway has a relatively large number of historic attractions and offers a good and wide range of outdoor activities. The Norwegians like to go hiking, not necessarily in order go somewhere, but purely for the pleasure of the walk. In addition to that, the Norwegians enjoy being at home, and even the concept of making themselves comfortable at home has spread to several countries where a larger proportion of leisure and social life normally takes place outside the home.

In modern times, as the country has gradually seen immigration from outside, the things available, particularly in the cities, have changed and become more globalised, and Oslo in particular has a very rich culture. Despite its relatively small size when compared with other European cities (around 700 000 inhabitants in 2020), Oslo is a big player, particularly on the concert scene.

In general, in the current situation, it is important to keep up to date with the relevant information on the consequences of the coronavirus affecting the living and working situation in Norway. This information can quickly change. 

Text last edited on: 11/2020