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Living and working conditions

Slovenia

GENERAL INFORMATION

Area - 20,273  km2

Population – 2,094,060

Official Language – Slovene

REGISTRATION AND RESIDENCE PERMITS

To reside in Slovenia for a period exceeding three months, you will need a residence registration certificate. You can obtain it at the administrative unit for your area. It will be granted on the basis of a valid identity card or passport. If you have employment lined up already, you should submit proof of that employment in the form of an employment contract. If you are studying, undertaking self-employment or retiring, you should provide evidence of that. You must also provide proof that you have a secure means of subsistence and appropriate health insurance. 

After receiving your residence registration certificate, you must register your residence at an administrative unit within three days. Proof of ownership, a rental contract or the consent of the owner are accepted as proof. Until they receive their residence registration certificate, citizens of EU Member States must register at the relevant police station, and must do so within three days of arriving in the country. 

However, as a national of a Member State of the European Union, you may only be refused residence in Slovenia if you do not meet the conditions for being granted a certificate or if you constitute a threat to public order or national security. 

You may acquire a permanent residence permit if you are an EU citizen and have been residing in Slovenia for five years (as demonstrated by a residence registration certificate). Until your permanent residence in Slovenia is registered, you will continue to have registered permanent residence in your own country.

LOOKING FOR A JOB

Vacancies are advertised publicly in Slovenia. Employers may publish vacancies with the Employment Service of Slovenia, in the media, on the internet or in publicly accessible business premises. It is compulsory to publish a vacancy notice with the Employment Service only for public sector employers, or a company in majority state ownership. 

Large companies may search for new employees through special recruitment sections on their web pages or through social media. Various employment web portals also list published vacancies from employers. Specialised agencies usually offer more demanding employment positions. Work for students and pupils as authorised by the relevant ministries is arranged through student organisations. 

A good way of finding work in Slovenia is to look at the ‘hidden’ labour market. You can find out about unpublished vacancies by networking, through direct contacts with employers, at job fairs or in other proactive ways (in professional journals, through business directories or social media). 

If you already live in Slovenia, you can register with the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS). This gives you access to various types of assistance when looking for a job. Via the poiščidelo.si portal, the ESS website will help you produce a CV in Slovenian, while the EUROPASS and EURES portals enable you to produce a CV in all European languages and in a variety of formats. This type of web service is also available from some agencies and employers. Neither the ESS nor recruitment agencies may charge a jobseeker to use their placement services.

INCOMES AND TAXATION

If you are permanently or temporarily resident in Slovenia or if you create taxable income on national territory or if you own taxable movable or immovable property, you are a taxable person and need your own tax number. 

Income tax is tax on the income of natural persons and is charged for income arising from:  employment, activities, the performance of agricultural or forestry activities, pensions, capital and the leasing-out of property.  Persons liable for income tax pay a monthly advance from their remuneration, which is taken into account in the final income tax assessment. 

In addition to income tax, individuals in Slovenia pay taxes, contributions and other compulsory duties, such as inheritance and gift tax, tax on real estate sales, tax on winnings accrued through games of chance, motor vehicle tax, tax on interest, a compensation fee for the use of building land, environmental levies and social security contributions. 

In January 2019 the average monthly gross salary in Slovenia was EUR 1729.15 (equivalent to EUR 1,115.98 net). The level of social security contributions for persons in employment amounts to: 22.10 % of the base (payable by employees) and 16.1 % of the base (payable by employers). These are contributions for pension and disability insurance, health insurance, parental care insurance, employment insurance, and insurance against injury at work and occupational diseases. 

Prepayment of income tax is calculated progressively during the year on all receipts as a tax deduction at the rates of 16 %, 27 %, 34 %, 39 % and 50 % for the income tax bracket depending on your tax base. The annual tax base from the income received by a resident in a tax year is the sum of tax bases from income from employment, income from an activity, income from the performance of an agricultural or forestry activity, income from the letting of property, income from the transfer of property rights and from other income, including the increases and reductions specified for the type of income in question. Slovenia has a general tax deduction and other special (personal) deductions; the latter are granted to disabled persons, secondary school or university students who receive income from work through the student employment service, and to persons with dependants. A tax deduction is also granted to persons who have voluntary supplementary pension insurance. 

When the fiscal year is over, the Financial Administration sends a provisional income tax assessment to your address by the end of May, based on data provided by the payers of your earnings, requests for special tax deductions, and capital gains assessment returns submitted in due time. If you agree with the provisional assessment, it becomes a final assessment, e.g. a decision, and therefore the basis for payment or for the refund for any shortfall in or surplus of income tax payments. 

Value added tax (VAT) is paid on goods transactions, service transactions and the import of goods. The general rate is 22 %. A lower VAT rate of 9.5 % is charged on food, water supply, medicines, medical equipment, passenger transport, books and newspapers, tickets for cultural and sports events, imports of works of art and antiques, etc.

COST OF LIVING

The main items of Slovenian household expenditure are expenditure on housing (rent, heating, electricity, etc.) and expenditure on food and drinks. Slovenian households also spend considerable amounts on transport, clothing and footwear, recreation, education and culture. Consumer prices increased by 1.4 % in 2018 in Slovenia. The largest contributions to annual inflation came from the price of water, electricity, gas and other fuels, communication services, healthcare services and rents. 

Average prices in Ljubljana are EUR 1.50 to EUR 2.00 for a cappuccino, EUR 5.50 for a cinema ticket, EUR 1.20 for a basic public transport ticket, and approximately EUR 600 to EUR 700 to rent a two-room flat in the centre of the city. Rents for flats in most other Slovenian regions are around 20 % lower than in Ljubljana. 

Compared to the EU average, consumer electronics, food and non-alcoholic beverages are the most expensive items in Slovenia, while the prices of alcoholic drinks, tobacco and restaurant and hotel services are considerably below the EU average.

Last updated: 06/2019

EDUCATION SYSTEM

The education system is mainly organised as a public service under which public and private institutions, and private operators that have been granted a concession, provide publicly approved programmes. 

Parents may enrol their child in a public or private nursery school that provides pre-school education from the time the child reaches 11 months of age until they enter compulsory education. Parents can choose between various programmes offered by a given nursery school. Public nursery schools enrol and accept children throughout the year on the basis of applications, provided that there are vacancies. Kindergartens provide pre-school educational programmes throughout the year. 

Compulsory primary school education in Slovenia is organised as a complete nine-year primary school programme. It is free of charge and lasts from age six to age 15. It is provided by public and private primary schools, as well as education institutions for children with special needs. Secondary education is divided up into general, vocational and secondary professional and technical education. Secondary education lasts between two and five years, with children generally enrolling at the age of 15. The school year lasts from 1 September to 24 June. Lessons for secondary school students in their final year end in the second half of May. Lessons are held five days a week (Monday to Friday). 

Lower vocational education programmes last for two years and are aimed at pupils who have completed their primary school requirements and successfully completed at least the seventh year of the nine-year primary school programme, or who have completed primary school education under an adapted programme. Upon completion of lower vocational education, students are qualified for basic occupations. A final examination certificate enables a student to find employment or to enrol in the first year of a secondary vocational education programme. 

Secondary vocational education lasts three years and finishes with a final examination that allows the student to find employment or continue their education. Secondary professional and technical education lasts four years and finishes with a vocational matura examination. This allows the student to enrol in tertiary vocational study courses. The general education (gimnazija or gymnasium) programme is the basis for further study at university. Slovenia has general and vocational gymnasium programmes, with the former being provided by general and classical gymnasium schools and the latter by technical, economic and art gymnasium schools. 

Tertiary education in Slovenia includes short-cycle higher technical education and higher education. Short-cycle higher education is provided by public and private higher vocational colleges. These practically oriented programmes last two years. Higher education is provided by public and private universities and other higher education institutions, and is carried out at university faculties, art academies and professional colleges. Courses at all higher education institutions are provided on the basis of the updated Bologna study programmes. First-cycle study programmes are university programmes and professional college programmes, while second-cycle study programmes are Master’s programmes. Graduates gain a diploma and a vocational or academic title. Study programmes are organised as regular or part-time programmes. The academic year runs from 1 October to 30 September. The language of instruction in higher education institutions is Slovenian, although certain study programmes are taught in English, Croatian or Serbian. 

Slovenia had four universities in the 2017/18 academic year (University of Ljubljana, University of Maribor, University of Primorska, University of Nova Gorica), as well as independent concession-holding higher education institutions providing publicly approved programmes. After completing a higher education professional or first-cycle university study programme, graduates can continue their education in postgraduate Master’s professional courses and, later, in courses to obtain the title of doctor of science. The exception to this are the standard second-cycle professional courses, for example in medicine, veterinary science, pharmacy and theology.

RECOGNITION OF DIPLOMAS AND QUALIFICATIONS

To reside in Slovenia for a period exceeding three months, you will need a residence registration certificate. You can obtain it at the administrative unit for your area. It will be granted on the basis of a valid identity card or passport. If you have employment lined up already, you should submit proof of that employment in the form of an employment contract. If you are studying, undertaking self-employment or retiring, you should provide evidence of that. You must also provide proof that you have a secure means of subsistence and appropriate health insurance. 

After receiving your residence registration certificate, you must register your residence at an administrative unit within three days. Proof of ownership, a rental contract or the consent of the owner are accepted as proof. Until they receive their residence registration certificate, citizens of EU Member States must register at the relevant police station, and must do so within three days of arriving in the country. 

However, as a national of a Member State of the European Union, you may only be refused residence in Slovenia if you do not meet the conditions for being granted a certificate or if you constitute a threat to public order or national security. 

You may acquire a permanent residence permit if you are an EU citizen and have been residing in Slovenia for five years (as demonstrated by a residence registration certificate). Until your permanent residence in Slovenia is registered, you will continue to have registered permanent residence in your own country.

USEFUL LINKS

http://www.gov.si/- Government of Slovenia

http://www.ess.gov.si - Public Employment Service

http://www.mddsz.gov.si - Ministry of Labour

http://www.mf.gov.si - Ministry of Finance

http://www.zpiz.si - Social Security

http://www.mizs.gov.si - Education

Education Recognition Unit: Kotnikova 38, 1000 LJUBLJANA. Tel: 00386 1 478 47 45

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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